Growing Communities: Student Researchers and Early Ideas in Blossom (Short-Session)

Responsable(s): 
  • The CAA Student Committee:
  • Kelsey Pennanen, University of Calgary
  • Molly Ingenmey, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Tekla Cunningham, University of Winnipeg

To follow the theme of Where Communities Meet, this session is aimed primarily at students, early-career researchers, and those interested in gaining more presentation experience, to provide a platform for the student archaeology community to share their voice. Presenting at a conference for the first time can be nerve-wracking, especially early on, so this session will comprise shortened talks that provide experience presenting in a more informal setting. Presentations for this session can involve a research project that you may only have preliminary findings for, the results of an honour’s thesis or independent project, a research proposal in its beginning stages, a story from the field season, a short history of your favourite find to date, an archaeology book review you’ve been wanting to share, your famous archaeology field recipes, etc. The only catch is your presentation must be given in only 5 minutes, so get ready for some speed talking! As each presentation will be only 5 minutes, please practice your presentation ahead of time to make sure your timing is on. Each group of 3 presenters will then share a 5-minute question period. Presentations will be grouped based on similarity in topic matter, so please provide a general description of the topic you will be discussing, in no more than 250 words, and send it to caa.students@gmail.com. Visual components for presentations from accepted presenters, such as PowerPoint slides, will be requested at least 3 days prior to the presentation date. This will allow presentations to be compiled beforehand to allow for smoother transitions between presenters to use the short timeslots as effectively as possible. We look forward to your submission and meeting the many communities represented in archaeology!