Canadian Journal of Archaeology
Volume 43, Issue 1 • 2019

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Journal canadien d'archéologie
volume 43, numéro 1 • 2019

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Table des matières

Hunter-gatherer Mobility, Territoriality, and Placemaking in the Kawartha Lakes
Region, Ontario

Left: Archaeological site distribution and major water features. Right: Ancient cemeteries and mound clusters. Circles are 10 km diameter to provide scalar reference. A: Gannon’s Narrows (Pigeon L.); B: Katchewanooka L.; C: Central Ontonabee (Peterborough); D: Mouth of the Ontonabee R.; E: Month of the Indian R.; F: Mouth of the Ouse R.; G: Strong Water Rapids; H: Percy Reach Rapids (right). Connolly, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 42(2):187, 190.

Méthodologie appliquée aux déchets de fabrication en os : Reconstruire les
chaines opératoires par l’approche technologique

Exemples de négatifs d’enlèvement d’éclats (à gauche sans accentuation, à droite avec relief accentué). Boisvert, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 42(2):218.

Chronometric Precision and Accuracy: Radiocarbon and Luminescence Age
Estimates for Pacific Northwest Cooking Features

Left: Map of study area and the location of the three sample sites. Right: Scatterplot with linear regression of luminescence and radiocarbon ages. Linear regressions were fitted to intercept at 0,0 assuming that if there is congruence between the dating techniques that they should have the same zero point. Vertical error bars indicate the two-sigma error for radiocarbon dates, and the horizontal error bars indicate the one-sigma error for luminescence ages. Line models and R2 values are provided in the chart area for comparisons of calcined bone/luminescence and charcoal/luminescence. Brown et al., Canadian Journal of Archaeology 42(2):243, 247.

The Pierce-Embree Site: A Palaeoindian Findspot from Southwestern Nova Scotia

Left: Photo of the findspot, facing east. The archaeologist is standing at the approximate location where the point was recovered. Thus, the point was found at the edge of the extreme high-tide mark, and is only inundated for a few hours a day. The erosion of the site was likely caused by storm surges and associated wave action over a long duration. Right: Photo of the obverse face of the Pierce-Embree Point. Betts et al., Canadian Journal of Archaeology 42(2):256, 257.

Canadian Journal of Archaeology 42(1)
Special Issue:

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Canadian Archaeological Association

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Journal canadien d'archéologie 42(1)
Numéro thématique :

Pour célébrer le 50e anniversaire de l’Association canadienne d’archéologie

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pour recevoir un exemplaire de ce numéro thématique
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Table des matières

Applying a Bayesian Approach in the Northeastern North American Context: Reassessment of the Temporal Boundaries of the “Pseudo-Scallop Shell Interaction Sphere”

Some diagnostic traits of pots belonging to the Eastern PSS Horizon. Méhault, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 41(2):142.

Elements of an Ancient Tsimshian Dwelling: An Archaeology of Architecture in Prince Rupert Harbour, British Columbia

Diagram of a North Salish dwelling showing slung walls supported using the tying and sewing technique, from Waterman and Greiner 1921:15, courtesy National Museum of the American Indian, image # PO8898. Patton, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 41(2):277.

Collaborative Public Archaeology in Manitoba: The Rural Museum Archaeological Outreach Project at Brandon University

Students testing artifact photography equipment at Brandon University. From left to right: Britney Weber, Ariel Neufeld, Krista Murray, and Zoey Black. Malainey et al., Canadian Journal of Archaeology 41(2):333.

News and Announcements

03 Jul

Final reminder for NMCA policy consultation deadline

Parks Canada continues to collect feedback from stakeholders who care deeply about the future of national marine conservation areas (NMCAs). If you have not visited our online engagement platform at www.letstalknmcas.ca, we would like to remind you that there is one week left to provide us with your comments and opinions on our proposed policy updates for NMCAs. The consultation period will end on July 10th, and your views will help shape a new policy for NMCAs.

25 Apr

Note Regarding Members' Safety at Upcoming CAA/AAQ Meeting

As we look forward to the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Archaeological Association in Quebec City, May 15-18th, the CAA needs to ensure in the most immediate way that participation in our organization and in our annual meeting is undertaken with a clear framework for professional conduct. The CAA executive is committed to doing what is necessary to ensure that our members, conference participants, and any public attendees are protected from harassment, assault, and other misconduct as they take part in CAA sponsored events and activities.

President’s Message Spring/Summer 2019

I would like to begin my President’s Message by thanking the organizing committees for the CAA and the Association des Archéologues du Québec (AAQ) who hosted a memorable conference in Quebec City. The CAA held its first Ethics Bowl this year. It was a great success, with a nail-biting finish that saw Team Memorial edging out Team Trent for the trophy. The event was well-attended and will clearly require a larger venue next year.

We are moving west to Edmonton for the 2020 annual CAA conference, which will be co-hosted with the Archaeological Society of Alberta at the Sutton Place Hotel from May 6–9. Kisha Supernant is chairing the organizing committee and preparations are well underway. The conference theme is “Where Communities Meet”, which identifies Edmonton as a meeting place for different peoples and nations over time. Presenters are encouraged to “think about how communities form, move, and interact in the past and present”. Our annual meeting will be moving east again in the following year to Membertou, Nova Scotia. It will be hosted by the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs at the Membertou Trade and Convention Centre and the adjacent Hampton Inn from April 28 to May 1, 2021. These are both exciting venues to look forward to.

Read More
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 43, Issue 1
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 43, Issue 1 • 2019
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 42, Issue 2 / Journal canadien d'archéologie volume 42, numéro 2
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 42, Issue 2 • 2018
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 42, Issue 1 • 2018
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 42, Issue 1 • 2018
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 41, Issue 2 • 2017
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 41, Issue 2 • 2017
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 41, Issue 1 • 2017
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 41, Issue 1 • 2017
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 40, Issue 2 • 2016
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 40, Issue 2 • 2016
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 40, Issue 1 • 2016
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 40, Issue 1 • 2016
  • Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 39, Issue 2 • 2015
    Canadian Journal of Archaeology Volume 39, Issue 2 • 2015

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